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having -- leading the sec. your calls, comments, and tweets on the announcement from the pentagon yesterday. 202 is the area code. give us a call -- join us on facebook at facebook.com/c-span2. let's begin with a look at one of the headlines this morning from "the new york times," a profile of a photographer in iraq. let me share with you a paragraph or two from "the new york times." -- we will share with you some more from the announcement yesterday at the pentagon. first, some of your calls. wilson joins us from little rock, arkansas. caller: even the women, even though they are just as brave in their bravery, there is no doubt about their bravery. the physical ability and stamina -- i am an ex-. tripper from the military -- ex- paratrooper from the military. training for women has gotten easier capri -- easier. women can be distracting for men as well. host: the orders to end combat exclusion, seeing that it will level the playing field in careers. brian on the republican line from wisconsin. welcome to the program. caller: glad i got a hold of you. first time on the program. i
. >> thank you. the pentagon made an announcement they would open up occupational specialties including confidantes to women. do you plan to try to block all or some of that plan? >> no. we have a process. i met with the undersecretary yesterday morning. the senate armed services committee can look incrementally as they make these changes. we can either talk them out of it or introduce legislation. if something that we do not know yet what they will come out with and they hear from the service chiefs, we will see what is reasonable. we will use our own judgment. i caution people who are hysterical about this. let's wait and see what they do. we will stop the bad stuff. >> the defense cemetery has said any exceptions will have to get approved by him. the implication is there are going to move fairly dramatically in this direction. do you have any concerns right now about what they have said so far about basically opening up all of these specialities to women? >> if they do that, they're going to have a fight on their hands. we do have that responsibility. if it means introducing legislat
of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a time of gradually reducing pentagon budgets. this will pay dividends for defense and to the family budget if the pentagon gets it right. it's clear that america is ready and equal to this challenge. the president has signaled his interests in leadership. the question is whether congress is equal to the challenge, ready with innovation, cooperation and leadership. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. poe: mr. speaker, in a remote region of algeria at an oil and gas facility in the dark of night before the sun rose, workers from all over the world were getting ready to si
the rocketer which is referring to the pentagon's decision to lift the ban on women in combat roles. coming up on this edition of "the washington journal," we will be talking with kayla williams about the decision to lift the ban on combat roles. later we will take a look at the best and worst bosses on capitol hill. we will be right back after this break. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> if we turned away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> it is a bully pulpit and you have to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> a zero antennas come up and tell me when somebody has their own agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante. she is the only one he can trust. >> many women who were first ladies, a lot of them were riders. >> they are in many cases more interesting as human beings tha
to bring it here on c-span but the hearing went late. under way at the pentagon, a briefing with general martin dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs and leon panetta, the defense secretary, announcing a change, the lifting of the ban of the use of women in combat. let's get back to the focus of the phone calls here on c-span. biggest foreign policy challenge for the next four years. democratic caller in florida. caller: i have been watching the program all morning and i see the biggest foreign policy challenge in the next four years is not so much one that takes us out of the country as it is bringing democrats and republicans together to do what's best for our country in regards to foreign policy. that's where i see the biggest challenge in the next four years is bringing those two parties together so we can all be safe and enjoy the freedoms that we have today. host: do you think it makes it easier for that to happen with the president appointing someone like john kerry? caller: i think john kerry is a prime example of how we can probably get that done just because of his nature of br
building the pentagon three times, go on 179 round trips to the moon, or build the keystone xl pipeline twice. president obama has won more inaugural event to attend to. that is this morning. the president and vice-president joe biden will be attending a prayer service at the national cathedral. that begins around 9:45. you can watch it on c-span3 or listen to it here on c-span radio. acts at about 10:30. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >[video clip] >> from the start, organized military of always spent a lot of their time fighting a conventional, a regular warfare. those terms don't make a heck of a lot of sense. that's one of the big takeaways that i had from doing six years of reading and research for this book. the way we think about this entire subject is all messed up. we think that somehow conventional warfare is the norm, but the way you want to fight is to have these the conventional armies slugging it out in the open. but the reality is those have always been the exception. think about the more modern world. was the last conventional war that we saw? it
to pull this off. >> the pentagon has started to take steps to prepare itself for the sequestration and planning that has not taken place until now. >> they are laying off temporary employees. it is starting to happen. >> senator inhofe has been critical about not planning earlier. the >> there is a little brinkmanship going. i do believe there was a time and when each everybody said we are all against it so how can have them? there never was a path that the two sides could find that would lead them to averting it. >> the center was critical of the president in the stance of his overall military and mention three ways the president has worked for cuts, and delays, and additions to the military budget. when you talk to officers of line, and you find them as critical of the administration that what is: on average is very dramatic. this represents a huge threat to the united states. there are others that would argue it is more a regional. the ability to react is clearly limited. when you look at individual things, there are concerns. afghanistan is another issue. >> these are big and c
of the united states senate. you can build a pentagon three times in that time frame. it's time that -- to pass a budget out of the united states senate and senator reid should not be paid until it's done. the house has acted responsibly. we have met our deadlines, we have set our priorities, i was part of the house budget committee when we put together budgets that try to get our out-of-control spending under control and rein in our $16 trillion in debt. the sfat has not acted one time in that time frame. it's time to make the hard choices and do the work necessary to restore fiscal responsibility to washington. it's time for senator reid to pass a budget or withhold his paycheck. thank you, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. we'll have order in the chamber, please. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i
recruiter. i have gone to the pentagon in support of the secretary of -- i'm sorry, sergeant major of the army in the 1980's so i'm going to say this and quantify by saying, on a security level, i think secretary clinton handled this very well. in the history of the united states, so much information is being demanded, that breaches security for the department of defense and all the other agencies within the military that i don't think these senators are aware of what they are asking her to divulge. when you say, why wasn't the video available? some information i classified -- is classified to a certain degree that they can't release it immediately. when we have people on foreign soil, our soldiers and marines, their jobs are limited by the act here in the united states and they know they can't go out there and say, hey, you guys are waving these flags, get away or to shoot them. they can't do that. so, to me, naive attitude that the senators who asked those hard questions were asking -- ludicrous. no way they should have been allowed to give responses immediately or to have firsth
command center at the pentagon and the c.i.a.'s center, having worked at the op center, i know that any information that indicates a threat to the safety of americans overseas is passed to overal agencies mentioned above. if it's of interest, it is the watch officer's job to make sure these other agencies are informed. he goes on. there are many questions that need to be answered and i'd like to present these questions. first and foremost what was going on while our consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> well, we can certainly give you greater detail but the op center is as you have described, the place where communications goes in and out. they were placing calls and receiving calls and deeply engaged in trying to help us. they don't reach out on their own but to help us acquire information so that we could monday? real time. >> and seven hours, goodness, gracious. there should have been a response. why did the delay in labeling the attack as terrorism when it was immediately known that it was. >> well, again, i would say, congressman that we described the attack. i described t
"washington journal." then the senate confirmation hearing for john kerry. live coverage of the pentagon news conference with leon panetta and martin dempsey. and about 45 minutes, winnie stachelberg on gun control. max boot on foreign-policy. bradley shear worker rights in the workplace. >> as secretary i have no greater priority responsibility. as i have said many times, i take responsibility. nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to be the state department -- to leave the state department safer and more secure. it meant moving quickly to respond to the immediate crisis, but also to further protect our people in high threat areas across the region and the world. host: we will get your reaction this morning to hillary clinton's testimony yesterday. we do expect misses clinton on capitol hill again today as john kerry has his hearing to replace her. for the first 45 minutes, we will get your reaction to the testimony. what's being written and on television. this is your chance to weigh in on what happened yesterday. democ here is the front page of "the washington tim
, there is no sunset on this bill. >> defense secretary leon panetta announced that the pentagon is ending the ban on women serving in combat. that is next on c-span. then, remarks from bobby jindal at the republican national committee last night. washingtonning's journal, we talk with bill kristol of the weekly standard. washington journal starts at 7:00 east anern. the emancipation proclamation was issued 150 years ago. today, a discussion on race and president obama's term. hosted by the new america foundation and the washington monthly magazine. live coverage is at 10:00 a.m. eastern. later, live coverage of the republican national committee winter meeting. our coverage begins at 1:00 pm eastern. >> one of the key themes for any exhibition on the civil war is abolition and emancipation. we are fortunate that those men came of age when they did. they make issues around the emancipation and abolition issues around human rights and american freedom on a general non-race specific level. i will go through every piece of information that johnson was in this paper -- picture. if you pay attention to
in iraq was much worse than it appeared from from afar. i was coming out of the pentagon. it was clearly unsettled. it looked much worse than we had thought. the first hope was that if we got saddam hussein, that would solve the problem. we made an effort to do that. in december, we picked up saddam. it became obvious that, as one of my guys described, a bunch of former miss -- regime guys were not really running the beginning of the resistance, the beginning of the insurgency. zarqawi had started to build a network that took trained people, or iraqi sunnis -- trained people, iraqi sunnis, who had been dislocated from their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu mus
to the tune of i think around $89 billion that are going to be put on the pentagon and domestic spending. they're dumb cuts. we are not looking at specific programs in evaluating their worth and eliminating some and keeping others. we just like, chop. this is no way to budget for a nation, and i hope we can delay the sequester. but it's coming up soon. republicans have vowed they want even more cuts maybe in addition to the sequester to negotiate, and i think we should remind everybody we've already had $1.7 trillion in cuts and we just did $600 billion in new revenue. that's about $2.3 trillion, mr. speaker, and, you know, how much more -- how much more cutting do we need to do, particularly when we talk about vital programs for americans? so, mr. speaker, i think if we're going to do cuts we should cut things that we really don't need. for example, medicare part d, passed in 2003, prohibits medicare from negotiating drug prices with the pharmaceutical companies. now, the veterans administration does negotiate for drug prices all the time, but medicare is prohibited from doing so. basically i
by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- that is what we call a leading answer. perception need to catch up with reality. the department has moved light years ahead. president obama has continued to ask congress for the resources we need to do that. women talk about the interaction with the private-sector, which we do in a number of areas already -- when we talk about the interaction with the private sector, which we do in a number of areas already, the part that controls the core infrastructure with our statutory irresponsibility to help protect the nation's infrastructure. when we talk about linking those things together from a security perspective, we are not talking about a regulatory overlaid. we're talking about how do you take part of our country that is -
was coming out of the pentagon. it was clearly unsettled. it looked much worse than we had thought. the first hope was that if we got saddam hussein, that would solve the problem. we made an effort to do that. appeared from from afar. in december, we picked up saddam. it became obvious that, as one of my guys described, a bunch of former miss -- regime guys were not really running the beginning of the resistance, the beginning of the insurgency. zarqawi had started to build a network that took trained people, or iraqi sunnis -- trained people, iraqi sunnis, who had been dislocated from their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu musab al-zarqawi. we were very sure he wa
lines to the white house situation room, the national military command center at the pentagon and the cia's op center. having worked as an officer, i know that any information that indicates a threat overseas is mentioned above. if the message is received, it is the officer's job to make sure that other agencies are informed. i would like to present these questions on his behalf. first and foremost, what was going on at the ops center in the state department while the consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> we can give you greater detail but it is as you described, the place for communications to go in and out. they were placing calls, receiving calls, deeply engaged in trying to help us. they help us require information so we can respond in real time. >> 7 hours, there should have been a response. white the delay when it was immediately known that it was? >> i would say that we described the attack, i described the attack the next morning, the president called it an act of terror. as you read in the classified and unclassified version, there were a lot of questions abo
john kerry, who testified at his confirmation hearing. today, leon panetta announced the pentagon was ending the ban on women serving in combat. we will have >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training you can get is walking a foot beat. you learn how to develop sources. you'll learn how to leverage relationships in the community. people in the community trust you, they will tell you when things are happening better not yet a crime. you can intervene. i really learned the most in my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother to the youngest police chief in washington, d.c., history, more with cathy lanier. >> secretary of state nominee john kerrey appeared at his confirmation hearing before the senate foreign relations committee. during this three-hour 15 minute hearing, he spoke about the september benghazi attacks and some of the foreign policy challenges facing the u.s., including iran, afghanistan, and syria. he also talked about the vietnam war after returning from vietnam over 40 years ago, he testified about his exp
military leaders the pentagon to cut from unsuccessful and outdated programs and put more money into the most successful and important programs. with that said, the only thing worse than the defense cuts and sequestration is no cuts at all. if we don't have the sequestration cuts at the top line revenue level went we will increase the debt ceiling with almost nothing to show for it. part of the reasons why the house republicans this week, extended the debt ceiling for three months to feel out paul ryan and his team to draft a budget that gets us balanced in 10 years but also protects the department of defense from further cuts because they have already been cut by $500 billion. >> do you get the idea, do you get the sense that americans are tired of world business. that doing some business here at home is gaining traction with people. are they world leadership weary? is the american hour ticking to a close? >> i think there is a degree of war weariness among the american people. it is not surprising. when your commander in chief is war weary you will be as well. when i was leadi
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)